Public Art Registry
The Point
Photo: Blaine Campbell
The Point by Steven Brekelmans - photo by Blaine Campbell
The Point by Steven Brekelmans - photo by Blaine Campbell
The Point by Steven Brekelmans - photo by Blaine Campbell
The Point by Steven Brekelmans - photo by Blaine Campbell
The Point by Steven Brekelmans - photo by Blaine Campbell
The Point by Steven Brekelmans - photo by Blaine Campbell
The Point by Steven Brekelmans - photo by Blaine Campbell
The Point by Steven Brekelmans - photo by Blaine Campbell
The Point by Steven Brekelmans - photo by Blaine Campbell
The Point by Steven Brekelmans - photo by Blaine Campbell
The Point by Steven Brekelmans - photo by Blaine Campbell
The Point by Steven Brekelmans - photo by Blaine Campbell
The Point by Steven Brekelmans - photo by Blaine Campbell
The Point by Steven Brekelmans - photo by Blaine Campbell
1768 Cook Street
Avenue One
Located in a plaza on the North-East corner of the property, at the intersection of Columbia Street and 1st Avenue West
Private development
2021
Bronze
Sculpture
In place
Privately owned - Strata
City of Vancouver Private Development Program
Description of work

A 20 foot tall metal post festooned with arrows and implements pointing in many directions. At grade four metal crates provide seating to visitors of the plaza.

The Point was commissioned by Concord Pacific as part of their participation in the City of Vancouver's Public Art Program for Private Development. 

Artist statement

The Point takes its form from the finger-post sign, used worldwide as a way-finding tool both in a formal civic capacity as well as in informal, ad- hoc situations. Finger-post signs can point to mundane and everyday places (train stations, toilets, bus stops) or at natural wonders, buildings and locations of historical importance and places of deep civic pride. Still other finger post signs point to places left behind or places dreamt about: signs pointing, with distances, to far away cities, inspiring longing for elsewhere or awe at the distances between us. 

This finger-post sign however provides none of these directions; the arrows provide no information and point seemingly randomly in every which way. It is at once both comic and melancholy, referring to possible histories, journeys, and most of all to the constant change and flux of the neighbourhood around it. The sign leaves it up to the viewer to determine the meaning of the arrows, and what they are pointing at. The artwork responds to the neighbourhood’s relative newness and lack of specific geographical histories. Ultimately, it invites passers-by to create their own direction and attach the narrative they see fit. 

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