Public Art Registry
Koco, Brewers Park, August 11, 2019
Photo: Rachel Topham
Koco, Brewers Park, August 11, 2019 - photo by Rachel Topham
Koco, Brewers Park, August 11, 2019 - photo by Rachel Topham
Koco, Brewers Park, August 11, 2019 - photo by Rachel Topham
Koco, Brewers Park, August 11, 2019 - photo by Rachel Topham
Koco, Brewers Park, August 11, 2019 - photo by Rachel Topham
Koco, Brewers Park, August 11, 2019 - photo by Rachel Topham
Koco, Brewers Park, August 11, 2019 - photo by Rachel Topham
Koco, Brewers Park, August 11, 2019 - photo by Rachel Topham
Koco, Brewers Park, August 11, 2019 - photo by Rachel Topham
Koco, Brewers Park, August 11, 2019 - photo by Rachel Topham
Koco, Brewers Park, August 11, 2019 - photo by Rachel Topham
Koco, Brewers Park, August 11, 2019 - photo by Rachel Topham
Koco, Brewers Park, August 11, 2019 - photo by Rachel Topham
Victoria Drive & Stainsbury Avenue
On private property fronting Stainsbury Ave
Private development
2020
Silicon Bronze, Stainless Steel
Sculpture
In place
Privately owned
Description of work

Koco, Brewers Park, August 11, 2019, 2020 was commissioned by Strand Development as part of their participation in the City of Vancouver's Public Art Program for Private Development. 

Artist statement

The public art Koco, Brewers Park, August 19, 2019 by Peter Gazendam is a single, significant sculpture orientated within the landscape architecture in a central, plaza-like location facing Stainsbury Avenue. The subject of the work is a group of women who practice “square” or “plaza” dancing in the neighbourhood. The tradition has roots in both ancient and modern Chinese history, and is a popular exercise routine performed to music in squares, plazas and parks around the world. These local performances have been a consistent scene in the otherwise rapidly changing community of Cedar Cottage. The sessions occur most mornings in the tennis courts at Brewers Park, at the Cedar Cottage Community House, or other nearby locations. The sculpture depicts one of these dancers, Koco, in six poses, each pose distinct but merging into one another, atop a square base. The sculpture was produced using 3D scanning and printing technology to capture the dancer and her movements before the final bronze form.

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